Request from Howard Thompson – for new name for NERC/BAS new ship

Howard <howard.thompson2@ntlworld.com>

 

19 Comments
  1. Tom Davies

    Good idea; a remarkable man.

  2. Lewis Clifton

    An absolutely fantastic suggestion, applauding much deserved (and overdue) recognition to be carried forward for the next generations.

  3. George Hemmen

    Whilst I have the greatest admiration for all that Charles Swithinbank achieved and contributed and would agreed that his name is worthy of commemoration, I do not believe that the naming of the new research ship after him is at all appropriate. He was not an oceanographer and, as far as I know, did little or no seagoing research.. Surely in the tradition of naming BAS ships, James Cook, or James? Weddel would be far more fitting.

    George Hemmen

  4. I entered Charles Swithinbank on the NERC website and it showed that no one else had done so. I think it was a good suggestion and hope others follow.

  5. Ted Clapp

    I favour the proposal to name the new ship ‘Charles Swithinbank’ and agree thoroughly with Howard’s resume. Regarding George Hemman remarks I think Charles did some work on board at least two survey/icebreakers along the Northwest Passage.
    Ted Clapp

  6. Andrew Bellars

    I would agree that the ship be called after Charles, An inspired thought.

  7. Andrew Wager

    Charles must have been one of the few people to have been to both poles. A fitting choice for the new ship.

  8. Hwfa Jones

    The Continent has become a graveyard of dead ‘worthys’ – must the ships continue the tradition? Is there no imagination left to think of a name with life in it?

  9. Garry Studd

    Excellent suggestion and thoroughly endorse!

  10. Robin Chambers

    I think the new ship should have a more general name like:
    “POLAR RESEARCH” or “UK POLAR RESEARCH”
    I feel that Swithinbank needs to rest a while longer before naming such a unique ship after him.

  11. I will add my name, I once had the privilege of talking with him about my brother’s pioneering work in ice depth radar. It would be a very good name for the ship.
    Brian Dorsett-Bailey (Trustee British Antarctic Monument Trust)

  12. Inigo Everson

    Several names, including CWMS, spring to my mind but the one that stands out for me is Dick Laws.

    As Director of BAS Dick Laws recognised that in line with the underlying justification of the Antarctic Treaty there was the need for BAS to be much more strongly science based. He guided the institute through the major, and necessary, transition from concentrating on exploration and survey into a leading international scientific research organisation. This was not helped by very serious budgetary constraints. The Falklands Conflict occurred In the middle of his period as Director. That was a time of major concern to all staff. Dick’s steady hand achieved enhanced funding that was central to the development of the science programme.

    In addition Dick, a Fellow of the Royal Society, was a leading scientist of great international repute. His scientific input was important in establishing the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Seals (CCAS) as well as the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), the latter setting the highest standards worldwide for regional fisheries management due to its ecosystem concepts, innovative at the time, but now slowly be incorporated into other resource management fora. .

    To the name the ship RRS RM Laws would be fitting tribute to a man who did so much for Antarctic science not only for the UK but internationally.

  13. Patrick Lurcock

    Nice idea. I quite like RRS James Weddell, keeping up the tradition of naming the Antarctic ships after early high-latitude maritime explorers such as Bransfield, Ross, and Biscoe. (There is already an RRS James Cook)
    Or if we are to try something new, how about Stuart Lawrence? Or indeed almost anything other than the flippant name that is doing the rounds!

  14. Malcolm E.A.Bedells

    I respect Charles Swithinbank greatly but consider that James Cook to be a more appropriate due to Cook’s been the first recorded sighting of Antarctica.

  15. Malcolm E.A.Bedells

    I respect Charles Swithinbank but consider that James Cook is a more appropriate name as Cook’s sighting of the Antarctic is the first recorded sighting.

  16. Ivor P. Morgan

    The new ship is the flagship of BAS and should evoke the image of BAS as an institution. For me, FIDS/BAS was a venture into the unknown, and held the promise of research and discovery. The ships of my association were the John Biscoe II, the Shackleton and the Protector–plus the Dan ships of J. Lauiritzen. The new name should have strong Antarctic historical associations. Names like Discovery and Terra Nova, or even the name Captain James Cook fit my thinking—as did the John Biscoe and the Shackleton. The name, Southern Cross, though used before, would be excellent.

  17. Ivor P. Morgan

    The new ship is the flagship of BAS and its name should evoke the image of BAS. For me, FIDS/BAS was a venture into the unknown, and held the promise of research and discovery. The ships of my association were the John Biscoe II, the Shackleton and the Protector–plus the Dan ships of J. Lauiritzen. The new name should have strong Antarctic and/or historical associations. Names like Discovery and Terra Nova, or even the name Captain James Cook fit my thinking—as did the John Biscoe and the Shackleton. The name, Southern Cross, though used before, would be excellent.

  18. Mike Dixon

    I agree with Hwfa, lets leave the “dead worthies” and embark on a new path,
    to more innovative names for the modern era of technology.
    As it happens, I quite fancy “Pole Dancer”
    Its slightly amusing, more than slightly appropriate, reflects modern culture ???

  19. Darwen Clifton

    Inigo too, makes a great suggestion – RM Laws. The time for adopting early explorer’s names – Weddell, Biscoe, etc is in the bygone era, I feel. Ideally a name from more recent times, but which leaves no doubt as to credibility and a lifelong contribution, if not dedication, to Antarctic Science, I believe to be much more fitting. I certainly favour a well recognized name from within the FIDS/BAS family.

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